Classroom Management Archives - Page 3 of 7 - Minds in Bloom

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Classroom management for an autism classroom looks different than how it does in a general education classroom. Our guest blogger, who is a special education teacher in an autism classroom herself, shares a variety of classroom management tips for this type of classroom. Click through to read all of her tips and to see photo examples!

Classroom Management in an Autism Classroom

Hi! I’m Nikki from Teaching Autism. From a young age, I always wanted to be a physiotherapist. Then, I collided with the world of Special Ed and never looked back. I completed my training in record time and headed straight to a wonderful Autistic Unit. I work with children diagnosed with moderate to severe, low functioning autism in the UK; my students are between the

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6 Ways to Strengthen Parent-Teacher Connections

Minds in Bloom is thrilled to welcome Jenn from The Teacher Next Door to the blog today! Jenn’s discussing those all important parent-teacher connections and sharing six ways that you can strengthen them – for everyone’s benefit, most especially the students’! Teaching forces us to be a jack of all trades. Not only do we have to plan meaningful lessons, teach (as well as manage

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Stability balls in the classroom are becoming more popular as a flexible seating option. However, would you have all of your classroom chairs swapped out for stability balls? That's what our guest blogger did, and she says she's never switching back!

Stability Balls in the Classroom

Please join us in welcoming Mrs. D from The Third Wheel to Minds in Bloom! Mrs. D has implemented stability balls in the classroom, so she’s sharing how she’s made them work to inspire you to try the same.   Sometimes I think I have a “type.” You know, that one student who is guaranteed to be in your classroom EVERY. SINGLE. YEAR. Mine is a small,

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Centers work in many classrooms, but do they work in yours? Not So Wimpy Teacher is our guest blogger for this post, and she shares five reasons centers work in her classroom - all the more inspiration for you! Get your tips and guidance in this post.

5 Reasons Centers Work in My Classroom

Hi! I am Jamie from Not So Wimpy Teacher. I am beyond honored to have the opportunity to be a guest blogger for Rachel Lynette.   I love to use guided math and reading groups to teach and differentiate in my classroom. This means that my students need to have independent centers that they complete while I am working with small groups. When other teachers

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Make your classroom feel like your students are welcome there by creating a comfy classroom. I share several ideas for making your classroom comfy and inviting in various aspects.

Creating a Comfy Classroom

Other than their homes, your students probably spend more time in your classroom than anywhere else, so you want to make sure that your classroom also feels like their classroom. Cute decorations are great, but to make students feel at home in their classroom, you may need to add a few more special touches. Don’t worry: It isn’t hard, and the benefits are huge. Both you and

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Boys can knit. Wait, what? The surprising history of knitting is that it started with men and was once a prized skill. While knitting is often associated with females today, boys can try knitting in school during read aloud time so that they have something to do with their hands. This is a great activity for kinesthetic learners!

Hobbies for Kinesthetic Learners: What Do I Do With My Hands During Read Aloud Time?

Hobbies for kinesthetic learners: Archery Target shooting Knife sharpening Tomahawk throwing Knitting Wait. What? Boys don’t knit!   I bet when you think of knitting, you think of a little old granny in her rocking chair. But do you know who dominates the history of the art of knitting?   Men. Macho men, in fact.   Knitting is a perfect quiet activity during read aloud time. Your boys, however, may need some

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Explore how to use life lessons as a classroom management strategy in your classroom. This can be a really effective way to utilize authentic, real-life situations as a way of relating to your students and managing their behavior. Click through to learn more!

Life Lessons: A Classroom Management Strategy

Please welcome Andrea from Love Learning to our blog today. She’s sharing her ideas on how to incorporate life lessons into your classroom management repertoire.   One of the biggest fears that I had when I first started teaching was classroom management. Even worse – I had accepted a position as a fifth grade teacher, and fifth graders kind of scared me! Sure, you learn

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Read a school counselor's step-by-step guide to implementing behavior contracts in your classroom! While this information is helpful for all teachers, it's especially helpful for new teachers, so be sure to share with a first-year teacher that you know!

Ain’t Misbehavin’: Behavior Charts in the Classroom

Please welcome Rebecca, a school counselor and the blogger behind CounselorUp. She’s sharing a great step-by-step guide on how to implement behavior contracts in the classroom and discusses all the different ways that can be used to find success for each student. Managing behavior is probably the most frustrating and difficult part of teaching. You’ve worked hard on a lesson, made it interesting and engaging, and one

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Effective classroom management includes cues for settling in and starting class. Our guest blogger shares his favorite ways to get students' attention and alert them to these important cues.

Cues for Settling in and Starting Class

If you’ve ever faced a group of middle school students before, then you know that they know when you’re struggling. They can sense it in the same way a dog can smell fear. Middle school students are at just the right age where they’ve seen enough teachers and have been in just enough classes to know if you’re justifiable. Because of this, I knew I needed a hook. The hook that

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What do you do when you have a bunch of wiggle worms in your class?! This guest post on Minds in Bloom shares four ways to accommodate students who are extra wiggly to help them find success and to help you improve your classroom management. Click through to read the whole post!

How to Deal With Class Wiggle Worms

 We are delighted to have Kayla from K’s Classroom Kreations guest blogging for us today! If you’ve got wiggle worms in your class, then you’ll find this post highly useful! Be sure to comment with your takeaways or other tips to share!   Ever have one of those years days where your classroom feels like an endless game of whack-a-mole with kids popping off of

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With the ever-increasing emphasis on testing, so too rises test anxiety. Help your students overcome their test anxiety with these brain-based tips.

6 Tips for Fighting Test Anxiety

Today’s guest blogger is Ellen from Brain Leaders and Learners. She’s sharing her six favorite tips for helping students to overcome test anxiety. Spring sends a refreshing new lilt into some students’ steps. Daylight stretches into late evening, outdoor events replace closed-in classes, and young friendships tend to blossom into new life for many students. Have you seen it? Why, then, does winter’s melt into

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Rachel Lynette participates in a book study of Unshakeable by Angela Watson. Read Rachel's key takeaways and click through to see what else the book has to offer.

Unshakeable: Incorporate Playfulness and Have Fun with Learning

Teaching is serious business, now more than ever. With Common Core standards, less and less recess time, an overwhelming number of high-stakes tests, and, of course, the many challenges students bring to the classroom on a daily basis, it really can’t be anything else…..or can it?   I would argue that even in today’s challenging environment playfulness and fun should still be a priority in

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Every teacher wants to help struggling students, but we don't always know how. This post describes how struggling students may be lacking certain processing skills that would make them more successful. Learn what they are and how to address the issues.

What Your Struggling Students Need You to Know

Today’s guest blogger is Cherice from Inner Pieces Gallery. She’s using her background as an educational therapist to provide some tips on reaching our most struggling learners to help them succeed.   Do you ever feel like some students in class are unreachable? Even though you believe all children can learn, sometimes they arrive at your classroom door not knowing how to read at the

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